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Strike authorization passes

Harrisburg- After three days of votes being taken from faculty of coaches in the union, the vote for a strike authorization passed with a 95 percent vote.
A simple majority was all that was needed to be passed, however many in the union were hoping for a overwhelming majority of it was going to pass.
In a press release put forth by the Association of Pennsylvania State College and University Facilities (APSCUF), Dr. Steve Hicks said that although a strike authorization passed, APSCUF will still work to negotiate a deal with the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education (PASSHE).
According to the press release 86 percent of members voted which means that between all 14 Pa state schools 5,160 members voted on the strike authorization and 4,902 members voted for a strike authorization.
Passing the strike authorization means that when the negotiating team from APSCUF feels that no progress is being made they can call for a strike.
Today, PASSHE put forth a statement responding to the authorization of a strike. In the statement PASSHE states that they believe they have a fair offer on the table and believe they will reach an agreement with APSCUF in the near future.
In order for a strike to go forward a meeting between the 14 presidents of the different APSCUF chapters has to take place. At that meeting a super majority vote of 10 out of 14 members need to vote in favor of the strike before it happens.
“We will continue to do everything we can to reach an agreement. A strike is truly a last resort,” Dr. Hicks said in the press release.
“That’s one of the good things about hiring our negotiator,” Dr. Kevin Mahoney of KU said in an interview on Tuesday. “He isn’t going to rush us into a strike.”
According to Dr. Mahoney the APSCUF negotiation team takes slow progress as progress and will not push a strike before it is necessary.
The next negotiation between PASSHE and APSCUF is set to take place on Dec. 11. Teachers and coaches in the PASSHE system have been working for the past 16 months without a contract.

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