KU student pushes for job preparation in cinema, television, and media production

By Jonathan Wolosyn
Contributing Writer

Liam O’Brien, KU student, is pushing to change the cinema, television, and media production major to make students more prepared to get a job right out of college.

According to O’Brien, the classes that should be included in the curriculum are an ‘after effects’ course and a photography/composition course to help students understand composition as well as work with a popular post-production program.

O’Brien’s first exposure to film came to him in his fifth-grade health class. He bought a camera, made a video to present to his class and fell in love with it, but he also took a liking to politics. He went to Northampton Community College and hopes to bring what he learned at NACC to KU in terms of job preparation.

According to O’Brien, KU doesn’t have material regarding freelance in the CTM major and says it should be incorporated into the senior seminar class at the very least.

According to the head of the CTM department, Cara Cotellese, the department appreciates everything O’Brien has done in terms of research and talking to others about what students want. O’Brien has worked with multiple departments and gathered information from current students to see their opinions on how the major is and what they think should be changed.

There isn’t much that can be done due to the size of the current staff and the workload they have to carry, according to Cotellese, who states, “It could be done in the future.”

O’Brien has experience in the field, although he didn’t start working until he was 22, so he knows what it’s like to work and get a job. His experience fell into his lap. He didn’t want to do freelance, but since the opportunity came up, he had to take it. He had an opportunity through an internship at Northampton, and on the last day of his internship with a company that worked with Crayola, they offered an internship for the summer.

According to senior seminar professor Dr. Matthew McKeague, they have been incorporating aspects of freelance and trying to get the class to touch base on it. He had O’Brien come in and speak with some students on the matter.

According to McKeague, it is a temporary fix, but the main issue is being short handed in terms of professors. Professors are stacked with work to do, so it is hard to get extra electives in.