Arts & Entertainment

Review: “Isle of Dogs”

By Nathan Colosimo
Contributing Writer

“Isle of Dogs” is a 2018 stop-motion animated film, written and directed by Wes Anderson. This is Anderson’s second stop-motion animated film, followed by 2009’s “Fantastic Mr. Fox.”

The film is set in a Japanese dystopian future, following a boy trying to find his dog after the species is banned from their city due to an illness outbreak and a historical bias in favor of felines.

Despite what seems like a somewhat comedic premise, in some areas even being outrightly labeled as a comedy, the film also works as a fantastic story. Wes Anderson has a particular narrative style and beautiful visual composition in his films.

Particularly in this movie, almost every shot is either perfectly symmetrical or beautifully composed and aesthetically pleasing.

Something else to note is how gorgeous the stop-motion animation presents itself.

Stop motion is a particularly agonizing process. The way these characters move is so smooth; the detail in each of their design and puppetry (particularly in the dogs’ fur) is a marvel to look at.

As mentioned before, this movie is a comedy, but while some jokes seemed to be few and far between—at least, the certain humor that is obvious enough to be a joke—it gave the audience a chance to be more invested in the story.

On the contrary, this film didn’t seem to get all of its ideas across. Some characters had little purpose and/or were not developed enough to be treated with as much importance as the plot does.

Despite this, it isn’t enough to ruin the experience. “Isle of Dogs” was a fantastic film, with a fantastic story and breathtaking animation. This film is certainly one you don’t want to miss.

 

Categories: Arts & Entertainment

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